DMX Control of a Daktronics Venus 7000 Video Controller

 Case Study, DMX, RS232  Comments Off on DMX Control of a Daktronics Venus 7000 Video Controller
Feb 142017
 

Canucks Arena & Video Ribbon. Photo from GLOBETREKIMAGES / 604 NOW FLICKR POOL

This was a fun one.  Turns out, the Daktronics Venus 7000 video controller can be trained to play content based on incoming RS-232 messages.  And, the trusty DecaBox can receive DMX and output all manner of RS-232 content.  When the dust settled, we ended up shipping a somewhat-modified version of our DMX to ASCII firmware.

Here’s the story, straight from the customer:

Recently, I was given this task of creating a lighting board to Daktronics Venus7000 lighting trigger and started out by looking at my relevant device ‘gozintas and gozoutas’ (ins and outs). 

I do not dabble too much in lighting control technology although I knew we are using a Grand MA on PC. I do provide in-house second tier support on our Daktronics LED systems and servers so I also knew that I needed to create some simple ASCII data strings on an RS-232 serial port. 

After asking the Google, I was able to find some articles about converting DMX to serial. This is the link that came up: http://response-box.com/gear/decabox-protocol-bridge-overview/ and this Decabox looked like the exact piece of ‘glue’ needed to convert lighting transitions to a Daktronics triggers. 

I took a bit of a chance and purchased the Decabox, (John Chapman at Engineering Solutions Inc. was also very helpful in that he returned my call and assisted me in determining a data scheme). I went back a to Daktronics Engineering and they were good with John’s proposed data string.  

Shortly after submitting my order, I received the Decabox which John had  pre-programmed and we were ready to test. We were very quickly able to see the appropriate serial data in our Dak server room and soon after got Dak to remotely configure the serial listen port. 

Success! 

This has solved an ongoing issue with playback synchronization of Daktronics content playback, and our house lighting.  We now have consistent and repeatable triggers during our game start opening sequences, whereas before we relied on an intercom countdown to mouse click (which was not very tight!). 

I would not only recommend this device, but also have kudos for John Chapman’s support and timely follow ups to our questions. 

GS | Broadcast Technician
Canucks Sports & Entertainment | February 2017

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 Posted by at 11:07 pm

DMX Control of a Wattstopper Lighting System

 Case Study, DMX, RS232  Comments Off on DMX Control of a Wattstopper Lighting System
Jul 292016
 

wattstopperbridge

 

The LMDI-100 Serial Interface allows third-party access to a Wattstopper lighting network.  Recently one of our customers needed to communicate with Wattstopper via DMX.  This was easily accomplished using the DecaBox and some custom DMX to RS-232 firmware:

From the mailbag:

I would like to thank you for all of your help with my latest installation project.  It seems that more and more often I am running into integration challenges with house lighting systems that need to interface with the DMX consoles.  Typically these systems utilize proprietary communication language, so it becomes necessary to convert them into something that can work with DMX.  

In this particular project, the only way we could make this conversion, was convert the proprietary system into RS232.  From there, we were able to convert the DMX system into a series of 232 commands, using the DecaBox Protolcal Converter to seamlessly interface both systems.  

At first, I was a little nervous about the prospect of making so many conversions, but the technicians at Engineering Solutions took care of inputting all of the necessary code and the system worked flawlessly right out of the box.  

When the contractor added additional dimmers to the system, all I had to do was ask for an update on the code and simply upload it onto the DecaBox the next day.  I wish all of my integration challenges were as easy to deal with as this was.  I will certainly be using the DecaBox in the future.  It saved me thousands compared to similar solutions.

Thomas Smith, Innovative Event Services Inc

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 Posted by at 6:27 pm

DecaBox Summer Custom Work

 Case Study, DMX, MIDI  Comments Off on DecaBox Summer Custom Work
Oct 192015
 

This summer we were pleased to see the DecaBox used behind the scenes for a couple of high-profile events.  In both cases, we provided custom firmware which allowed the end user very precise artistic expression.

For the first project, we spent a few days in email discussions with one of the lighting directors at America’s Got Talent.  When the dust settled, we ended up with this DMX to MIDI functionality, which I shared with some less-technical friends the night of the first show:

On tonight’s broadcast, each time a contestant is chosen, a group of lights will pan, tilt and focus so that the artist is highlighted. Our box lurks on the lighting network and listens for that cue to occur. When it does, we send a special MIDI message to a computer in audioworld. This machine is in charge of playing the ‘whoosh’ effect on stage and as part of the master audio feed.

The designers love having light and sound effects exactly locked in sync, each and every time a contestant reveal occurs.

One instance of the effect can be seen within the first few seconds in the video clip below.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rxi7pvL86IM

 

The second project involved some edits to our standard MIDI to DMX firmware (specifically, adding support for the MIDI sustain command, then making sure that the resulting DMX output behaved accordingly).  In the designer’s words:

When we were asked by Renegade Lighting Design in London who were putting together an installation for Swedish Lighting company Hem for the London Design Exhibition to provide a piano which could control the 88 lighting fixtures.

We were looking for a solution to a couple of midi to dmx related issues – the tricky thing was that for part of the time the Yamaha Disklavia would be in self-play mode getting midi files from a hidden playback system – for other parts of the day, various classical pianists would be playing the rig –

We turned to the Decabox after trying a few different solutions which didn’t really fit the bill as we needed sustain and velocity control of the lights vi midi.

John was such a help in trying to get the sustain pedal to also control the lights – Many many thanks and will definitely be getting a few more! The client was very happy so job well done!

Cheers – Laurie (www.playback.systems)

JE5_0933

Click to Enlarge

Thanks to the AGT team and Laurie in the UK for the chance to collaborate during these events.

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 Posted by at 10:00 am

DecaBox Converts DMX to MIDI Program

 Case Study, DMX, MIDI  Comments Off on DecaBox Converts DMX to MIDI Program
May 022015
 

elationA few months ago a customer asked if we could help with a custom DMX to MIDI conversion problem.  They were using an Elation Show Designer 3 lighting desk and needed to recall lighting scenes via MIDI input.

They wanted a second DMX console to, among other things, be able to trigger these scene recall messages.

The Elation manual reveals that the console can store 48 scenes on each of 99 pages, or 4,752 different looks. These scenes can be recalled using a MIDI ‘Channel Mode‘ message, which is three bytes long.  The format is

$BX $XX $YY

…where $0X is the MIDI channel number [0 15] and then $XX and $YY are a pair of 8-bit numbers, of which the lower seven are available.

So, we ginned up a simple firmware personality for the DecaBox which lets the MIDI channel and values $XX and $YY be easily defined via three consecutive DMX channels.

Everything worked perfectly.  We asked the client if they could provide any other detail about the overall installation, and they replied with this short description.  Unfortunately, no photos or video were available to share.

I used the dmx to midi device to change scenes on a lighting desk in a roller rink to simulate what was going on in a laser zone arena.

For instance when a base station(let’s say red base) was under a attack the roller rink lights would flash red then when the base was destroyed the rink would flash white for a few seconds.

The setup I used was a computer running Light factory that controls the laser zone arena to send dmx to the midi box to allow it to change pages and scenes on a Elation Show Designer 3 lighting desk.

This setup worked great as I didn’t need to setup a 2nd universe or change any fixture addresses, I could simply tap into the prebuilt lighting scenes the desk provided.

Thanks again!

-Joel

It’s always neat to hear what how our gear is used around the country. If you need something similar, please let us know.

 Posted by at 2:24 pm

MIDI to DMX Slowdowner Rescues an Installation

 Case Study, DMX, MIDI  Comments Off on MIDI to DMX Slowdowner Rescues an Installation
Mar 062015
 

Last month we had the chance to combine a pair of firmware versions – our MIDI to DMX Converter and the DMX-Massaging Slowdowner to help a client in Europe with a tricky installation.  Both firmwares are running simultaneously in the same chassis, which can be very useful in situations like this.

Unbranded DMX Decoder Doesn't Like Strict DMX Timing

Unbranded DMX decoder doesn’t like strict DMX timing.

In his words,

My company provides complete computer solutions to the broadcast industry specifically within the gameshow market.  As such I frequently visit countries all over the world and have to interface computers with many different types of dimmers and decoders.

The equipment I used to supply has become obsolete so I got in touch with Engineering Solutions.  Their Decabox interested me and with the Midi to DMX interface was exactly what I required.

It’s always a concern when changing over to new kit but I was reassured by quick responses to email and the phone support offered which was very fortunate because I have just finished a Job in Eastern Europe where the ‘slow’ firmware has just basically saved the show.

I had to connect my system to a ‘working’ lighting rig, already tested by the lighting engineer with his Martin lighting console.  I superficial inspection of the rig revealed unbranded decoders (photo attached), each controlling three desks of 12.  The RGB feeds all wired into one channel (I only need to switch desks lights on/off).  All I was told was that the decoders were manufactured in Turkey!

Firstly all appeared well during the usual channel configuration etc. but soon I began to experience some rather unusual effects.  ‘Desk’s’ 5 and 6 could not be controlled independently i.e. when switching on desk 6, 5 would flicker at random.  The same happened for desk 9 and 10.  I could re-create the exact same problem using my ENTTEC controller connected directly to my PC but strangely the lighting engineer had no problems whatsoever using his Martin lighting console.  Further, I was not able to fix the problem by dropping the DMX refresh rate, even as low as 20Hz.

Finally, after advice from John, I changed to the ‘DMX Slowdowner’ firmware which solved the problem immediately.  I was staggered by this apparently simple fix and extremely grateful for the expertise and experience of Engineering Solutions.

The moral of this tale – In future I will be much more wary of unbranded kit!

Thanks again for all you help,
Jeffrey Bowman
iUK Systems Ltd

 

Thanks, Jeff, for the chance to work with your company on this project.

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 Posted by at 6:33 pm